FOOD BLENDING CASE STUDIES

FOOD BLENDING WHITE PAPERS & ARTICLES

  • Contamination Control In Food Processing Equipment

    An inability to prevent contamination occurring, no matter how severe or minor the case is deemed to be, can result in manufacturers failing to pass inspections and can undermine public confidence in their brands. This article highlights issues processors experience in preventing contamination and how engineering for contamination control in food processing equipment can be a solution.

  • Best Practices For Conducting Virtual FAT’s In Food Manufacturing

    When the COVID-19 pandemic hit, it became critical that manufacturing plants remain open and operating to provide essential items such as food, beverage, sanitation supplies and more to consumers. New practices were put into place to ensure the safety of all and maintain efficient, effective operations. A critical aspect of keeping up with consumer demand has been the testing and acceptance of new equipment. With consumer packaged goods (CPG) companies reluctant to bring suppliers into their facilities and service technicians limited in their ability to travel due to COVID-19 protocol, the industry has had to get creative to complete the process.

  • 10 Things You Should Know When Considering A Tumble Blender

    Whether you're considering a tumble blender for your process or shopping for a suitable piece of blending equipment, here are 10 things you should think about before the making final decision.

  • 5 Steps To Increase Energy-Efficient Mixing

    Mixer testing simulation trials are needed to confirm the suitability of a specific mixing strategy. This white paper explores five ways to increase energy efficiency in new and existing mixing processes.

  • Solutions To Batch Mixing Issues

    Mixing processes vary from one application to another and there are no fix-all solutions.This white paper presents some strategies for improving commonly encountered batch mixing problems.

  • Efficiencies In Powder Dispersion For Manufacturers

    Uniformly dispersing powders into a liquid batch in a practical amount of time is a common problem for F&B manufacturers. This white paper explores five tips for dispersing powders more efficiently.

FOOD BLENDING PRODUCTS

The introduction of powders into a fluid process is one of the most challenging mixing duties you will come across. Incorporating powders directly into a liquid stream, can speed up your process, improve your product quality, while at the same time improve operator safety.

The latest development in high shear lab mixing – the new Silverson L5M-A – is ideal for all laboratory work, research and development, QA analysis and small scale production in all industries.

Silverson Mixer Homogenizers are fast and efficient and are capable of producing a fine droplet or particle size, typically in the range of 2 – 5 microns. This degree of homogenization is suitable for the vast majority of products, such as sauces and flavor emulsions, creams and lotions.

The new line of Model 42C Cylindrical Ribbon Blenders are designed to mix dry powders, wet granulations, and paste-like materials with densities up to 100 lb/cubic foot. Available in many sizes from 1/2 to 1,000 cubic feet working capacity, Cylindrical Ribbon Blenders can be built for atmospheric, full vacuum, or internal pressure operation. A full range of standard, heavy-duty, and sanitary models are offered.

The Charles Ross and Son's Ribbon Blender range in capacity from 1/2 cu. ft. to 515 cu. ft. capacities. Ross Blenders are stocked and are constructed in carbon and stainless steel. Standard and Sanitary models are available to meet special production requirements.

The ROSS Model HSM-405SC-25 is an inline high shear rotor/stator mixing system incorporating SLIM (Solids/Liquid Injection Manifold) Technology. Unlike conventional eductors, the unique SLIM rotor/stator generates a powerful vacuum without the aid of external pumps and pulls powders directly into the mix chamber, promoting instantaneous wet out under high shear conditions. Mounted on a multipurpose skid with load cells, actuated valves and level switches, the pictured HSM-405SC-25 recirculates into a 400-gallon jacketed tank and is controlled from a 15” industrial PC with Windows.

Rental blenders available for a nominal monthly fee. Test the AC+ dry blender in your facility to ensure it works well in your current system.

ABOUT FOOD BLENDING

Industrial food blending usually refers to the process of mixing two distinct solids or mixing of bulk solids with small ratios of liquids. Blending and mixing are interchangeable terms. However, blending is generally more gentle than mixing, which is why it’s technically different. The outcome of blending is to take two or more pure elements and combine them into a new product where samples of it will contain the same ratio of the elements that were combined to be blended.   

Examples of products created from mixing solids in food manufacturing include: cake mixes, coffee, tea, beverage powders, ice-cream mixes, yogurts, spices, flours, trail mixes, and cereals.

Examples of or products created from mixing solids with liquids in food manufacturing include: confectionary, pasta, ready-to-eat cereals, pet foods, and dairy products.

Blending equipment is offered in various styles. The style that your food-making operation needs will be based on many different factors, such as, but not limited to: what products are being blended, efficiency, batch size, the facility’s available manufacturing space, preciseness of the blend, energy costs, discharging options, cleaning, and sanitation options.

The most-common styles of blending equipment are:

  • Ribbon Benders — are the most-popular blenders. They use helical ribbons, accommodate larger batch sizes, are very versatile, and cost efficient.
  • Vertical Blenders — are cone shaped and designed for vacuum operations. These blenders are easy to clean, are gentler than horizontal blenders, and have virtually 100 percent discharge.
  • Tumble Blenders — are double-cone shaped and rotate on a horizontal axis. These blenders are generally used for precise blends and thorough blending of powders.
  • Paddle Blenders — These blenders use multiple paddles as agitators and accommodate larger batch sizes. They also have very low shear and generate very minimal heat.

After choosing the style of industrial food blender that will suit your company’s food-processing requirements, it will be equally important to make sure the ribbons, paddles, rods, and shafts are matched to the physical properties of the elements being blended. This is imperative to ensuring better efficiency and reducing maintenance downtime.